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About at the Department

The Polish section teaches Polish philology (Polish language and literature) in Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programmes. It also offers Master’s degrees training future teachers of Polish for primary and secondary schools, plus a Master’s degree in Polish for translation theory and practice. All these degrees are available as full-time studies; additionally, the Polish section offers the Bachelor’s degree ‘Polish for Business’ in part-distance form. The section also teaches Polish as an additional Slavonic language for students of other language degrees, and Polish as a foreign language for students of all faculties at the University – as well as conducting Polish language examinations for doctoral students in other fields and providing language consultancy services. The Polish section runs a doctoral degree in Polish language (and contributes to the Department’s doctoral degree in comparative Slavonic philology), and it also has the right to confer full professorships and associate professorships. Research at the Polish section focuses on Czech-Polish comparative studies from both diachronic and synchronic perspectives, Czech-Polish phraseology, the Polish language in the Těšín (Cieszyn) region and specific issues of the Polish minority community in this region, the Polish language in the Czech Republic, Polish-Czech communication in business, literary comparative studies of contemporary Czech and Polish literature, Polish-language literature in the Czech Republic, and Polish teaching methods in the Czech Republic.

The Russian section teaches Russian philology (Russian language and literature) in Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programmes. It also offers Master’s degrees training future teachers of Russian for primary and secondary schools, plus a Master’s degree in Russian for translation theory and practice. All these degrees are available as full-time studies; additionally, the Russian section offers the Bachelor’s degree ‘Russian for Business’ in part-distance form. It also contributes to the Department’s doctoral degree in comparative Slavonic philology. The section teaches Russian as a foreign language for students of all faculties at the University – as well as conducting Russian language examinations for doctoral students in other fields, providing language consultancy services, and organizing preparatory courses for future students of Russian at the Faculty of Arts and courses for Russian language teachers. Linguistic research at the Russian section focuses on foreign-language communication in the sphere of business, communication barriers and lexical interference, including issues of communicative syntax and language models. Literary research focuses on the reception of Russian literature and culture in the Czech context, interdisciplinary issues related to literary theory and its methodology (East and West: the evolution of Slavonic and Western aesthetic-philosophical thought, literary movements, cultural epochs and literary forms as such; comparative genological-hermeneutic approaches: theory and methodology, “deep hermeneutics” and its spiritual and moral dimension; the evolution of global literary-theoretical thought; comparative morphology of history and culture, and the consilience of literature and philosophy).

The applied Slavonic studies section provides courses in a range of Slavonic languages (Belarussian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Polish, Russian, Slovak and Ukrainian) for students of all degree programmes at the Faculty of Arts. The teachers also act as consultants on issues related to comparative Slavonic philology. Research at the section focuses primarily on comparative studies of phraseology in West Slavonic languages (Czech, Slovak, Polish, Kashubian, Upper Lusatian and Lower Lusatian).


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